1.29.2012

Guest Blogger: Kelly of Beauty Obsessed

Hello lovely beauties!

I'm excited to begin the Guest Blogging series here on Beauty by Arielle. Each month, a fellow beauty blogger will be writing in and sharing the beauty love!

I'm excited to have Kelly of Beauty Obsessed as my first guest blogger! Kelly's blog was one of the first I discovered after beginning mine and she has been extremely supportive and wonderful! She is also one of the co-hosts of the Monday Beauties Blog Hop.

image via Beauty Obsessed

In this post, Kelly will be blogging about nail files. Take it away Kelly!

Hi, my name is Kelly and I have a beauty blog, Beauty ObsessedI’m extremely honored to be able to do a guest post on Arielle’s blog today!  I'm really into nails, nail polish, nail art, the whole nine yards. I am in no way a professional nor do I claim to be, however  I have learned a lot of tips and tricks from doing my nails over the years. In this post I want to talk about nail files, all the different ones out there, which ones are actually useful and which ones aren’t. Included with some tips on how to properly file your nails.




I believe that everyone should own a good quality nail file that is categorized by a grit number. A grit number is the roughness of a nail file. The lower the grit number the rougher the nail file is. For example; Nail salons use a 100 grit file for acrylic nails, that is way too rough on natural nails even if you have thick nails. The grit number I use is 240 and my nails aren’t really thick but there not thin either. Grit numbers that are safe for natural nails are 240, 300, 400, 600. A nail file with a 600 grit could be used on any natural nail and would never rip or tear your nails. So you get the idea, right. They sell these nail files at Sally’s Beauty Supply and other beauty stores. I haven’t seen them at drugstores though. You want a nail file that suits the type of nails you have. You can usually find ones that have the grit number right on the file like mine. 


METAL FILES 

All I can say about these files is that if you own one then throw it out lol and if you use it PLEASE DON’T! This file is as useful as a brick, seriously! These are the types of files that come with manicure sets, so we've all probably owned one at one time. There way too rough and all they'll do is damage your nail plate and cause peeling. 

DECORATIVE FILES 

These are the files that you can find at the dollar store or basically anywhere and there probably no more than $2. There pretty to look at and I have a few that I've gotten for presents and that I bought a while ago. But truthfully, there not made out of good quality and they wont file and shape your nails very well. They wear very quickly so if they did file your nails chances are it would only be one time.

THE 7-SIDED NAIL FILE: 

I really like these files and find them very useful. You can get these at any drugstore and I like how each side is labeled for you.

1-     Coarse Grit
2-     Medium Grit
3-     Fine Grit (to neaten edges of nail)
4-     Even Out
5-     Smooth Out
6-     Buffer
7-     Shiner

Number 3 is probably equivalent to the 240 nail file I use. Number 1 & 2 are a little too rough (for my nails anyway). I like # 3 a lot and use it after to smooth and even out the tips of my nails. You can definitely use # 5, 6 & 7. However, I prefer to buff my nails with a nail buffer block because I find it a lot easier. # 7 is good for a natural look with no polish. The one thing I did notice about these files are that they don’t last too long for some reason. I find myself buying a new one every 6 months or so. But there not expensive , you can probably get one at any drugstore for no more than $3.

CRYSTAL/GLASS FILES 

These files have become really popular lately. It’s not a nail file you would use if you wanted to file down your nails, but it’s a file you would use to shape your nails without having to worry about it ever tearing your nails or causing peeling. The grit on a crystal file is probably between 400 and 600. (Remember when I said a 600 grit would file natural nails without any tearing or peeling). After I have filed my nails with my grit file, evened them out with the 7 Sided File, I use this to file them into the shape I want. These are a little more expensive depending on where you buy it but I feel like it’s a good investment. I think I paid around $8 for mine but they do last a while

NAIL BUFFER BLOCK: 

There is actually a wrong way and right way to buff your nails.  First off, buffing is for smoothing out ridges you have in your nails or to get rid of any residue from when you filed your nails before hand.  It’s really not necessary to buff your nails every week or every time you give yourself a manicure. Too much buffing can cause your nails to weaken or cause peeling. When you do buff your nails start at the cuticle and work your way down to the tip in one gentle motion. Don’t buff your nails using a back and forth motion, this can cause damage to your nails. If you plan on not using any nail polish, use the part of the buffer that smoothes or shines your nails. They do really make your nails look polished.

TIPS FOR FILING YOUR NAILS. 

-You can use a nail file if you need to take down some length, but if you want to get rid of more than 1cm long I suggest using nail clippers. Otherwise a nail file is fine.

- Make sure your nails are not wet or damp when filing, because your nails are at there weakest point when wet. 

- Filing your nails should be the first step in your manicure, that means filing with your nail polish still ON. Why? The nail polish acts as an adhesive on your nails reducing your chance of splitting or breaking your nails while filing. It will also help you see the tip of your nail better bc of the contrast  between the color of the polish and your actual nail. I find that my nails are so much easier to file with the polish still on.

 - If you file under the nail at a slight angle it will give you more control because the tip of your nail will be visible the entire time you're filing. 

Determine whether your nails are thick or thin, this will help you determine which grit number is best. Thicker nails can use something around 220 and thin nails would need something like 300 or higher.

- For the most part nail filing should be done in one direction. The only way I would say that you can go back and forth was if you were using either a crystal file or a grit number of 400 or higher

-    Keep filing in one direction until you reach the length you want. Once you have the desired length, finish by sealing the edge of your nails. Run the file from above your finger down the nails edge. This makes the tips smoother.

Kelly, is the author of Beauty Obsessed. A blog where you can find tons of beauty tricks & tips, product reviews, DIY treatments or projects, basically anything beauty related.  On twitter you can follower her at @kellabel. You can check out her blog here or contact her at kelbananas14@yahoo.com.

Thank you so much for guest blogging today Kelly!